Los Angeles Times: "A new U.N.C.L.E. with coolness, humor, grit and fashion sense"



On a misty October evening at the Old Royal Naval College, on the set of Guy Ritchie's "Man From U.N.C.L.E.," Armie Hammer climbed out from behind the steering wheel of a cute, little snub-nosed East German car called a Trabant.
"I don't think these cars were made for people," said the 6-foot-5 Hammer, filming a chase scene set in 1963 Berlin with co-stars Henry Cavill and Alicia Vikander. A stunt driver operated Cavill and Vikander's vintage Wartburg remotely from above as the cars performed a kind of side-by-side automotive ballet.
The period spy movie, due Aug. 14, pairs Hammer and Cavill as a duo on opposite sides of the Cold War, in roles popularized decades ago on television by Robert Vaughn and David McCallum. The characters, like the cars, are vintage, but the story is new.

"We originate from different sides of the Cold War initially, and we're forced together because circumstance requires it to fight world terrorism," Cavill said as he and Hammer waited in between setups. "There's a coolness, a humor and a little bit of grit as well."
Neither of the young actors was alive when "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." first aired as a 1960s TV series that teamed Russian and American secret agents under a fictional global intelligence agency called the United Network Command for Law and Enforcement.

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